Converting the Converted

The more I read the Gospels, the more I am convinced that we would be the first to condemn Jesus and pin him to a cross all over again. That, in spite of two thousand years of knowledge, and canon, and religious conversations, and catacombs, and persecutions, and the dawn of “Christ-ianity.”

To read the Gospels honestly is to place oneself in dangerous places indeed. It is the readiness to identify as a sheep or a goat; as a disciple or a Pharisee or a religious teacher or a widow or wheat or weeds. We have so objectified the good news into our neat, neo-Platonic categories that we’ve rendered ourselves incapable of being seekers; the very posture required by Jesus to see – God, others, even oneself.

If the Gospels tell us anything they tell us how easy it is to build an impenetrable club of pretense and walls of preconception around our faith. The Pharisees did it and Jesus was forever pissed off with them. The biggest challenge to conversion is the belief that one is already converted and without any further need. It becomes poisonous to the very humility that would otherwise find us deeper in grace and living more abundantly.

It is the great proclamation of the convinced. 

Richard Rohr calls this what it is: idolatry. It is the worship and protection of the means to an end rather than the journey toward the beginning. He tells us, “religions should be understood as only the fingers that point to the moon, not the moon itself” (Everything Belongs, p. 51). He believes, and has built a career upon, the notion that all true spirituality is about seeing and letting go in order to see still more.

I have found that it is often to my benefit that I am both A.D.D. and a mystic. That way, when I begin to ramble (a common occurrence!) and someone tells me to “just get to the bottom line,” I can retort with the same refusal Jesus used in such instances. He cared little for such things and besides, it is the misguided idol of a success-driven culture built on information and accumulation rather than instruction and awareness.

I’m aware how much this frustrates my type A friends. For naysayers however, more often than not, they don’t ask again!

Says Rohr, “preoccupation with exchange value and market value tends to blind us almost totally to inherent value…Everything becomes priceless if it is sacred. And everything is sacred if the world is a temple” (Ibid, p. 56). To expect life to produce some kind of “bottom line” is the demand for Jesus to offer a sign. Like the Pharisees, we insist, “just get to the point” and do so in a way that impresses me, asks nothing of me, gives me answers rather than better questions, perpetuates my misguided presuppositions, assures me I’m in and you’re not, and never invites me to step out and journey. Moreover, it promises more darkness and blindness and no actual change. I will still see what and how I want complete with all my preexisting opinions and skepticism.

The Pharisees Question Jesus.jpg
The Pharisees Question Jesus – James Tissot (1836-1902)

To see is the one great gift of all true spirituality. Jesus spent a lot of time healing blind people and a lot of time blinding self-proclaimed seers. When all we crave are answers, solutions, and the pragmatics of control, then it is we who stand in need of a raised voice from Jesus. We become the gatekeepers. We become those who, alone, claim to know the Way, the Truth, the Life. We are those possessing the Words of life but in restrictive, mechanical ways upheld in our own Sanhedrins.

christ-healing-the-blind-man-1560.jpg!Large.jpg
Christ healing the blind man – El Greco, 1560

And that is what makes us the most ready to feel we need nothing more. We, the converted, stand most in need of conversion. Jesus spent a lot of time in an already protracted ministry window healing blindness. This I believe was no accident. He was particularly drawn to this because of it’s wonderfully metaphorical teaching platform. And I’m sure that someone healed of their blindness would be most deeply grateful; most readily loving.

To see therefore, is to love. And to love is the heart of the Gospel message. Until we love as Jesus loved, we may yet stand in need of conversion. To say otherwise reveals a spiritual smugness, a theological self-satisfaction bent more on winning arguments than whispering prayers.

These days, I rest secure in the knowledge that the same grace offered to the pimps, whores, and swindlers is offered to the converted and the righteous. Jesus spent more time arguing with one and partying with the other.

I hope I am always the latter.

7 thoughts on “Converting the Converted

  1. I really enjoyed this post, particularly where you said, “Jesus spent a lot of time healing blind people and a lot of time blinding self-proclaimed seers.” What a great way of describing the way things are if we aren’t aware and if we become complacent… “impenetrable club of pretense.” There’s a great deal here to think about. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Lynn Mondor

    After reading this post and your last several, I’m realizing how much I’m missing our discussions. It’s not very often that you find someone with whom you are so in synch with. Please keep these coming. They are truly food for my soul.

    Lynn the Finn

    innerwoven wrote: > a:hover { color: red; } a { text-decoration: none; color: #0088cc; } a.primaryactionlink:link, a.primaryactionlink:visited { background-color: #2585B2; color: #fff; } a.primaryactionlink:hover, a.primaryactionlink:active { background-color: #11729E !important; color: #fff !important; } /* @media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) { .post { min-width: 700px !important; } } */ WordPress.com robertrife posted: “The more I read the Gospels, the more I am convinced that we would be the first to condemn Jesus and pin him to a cross all over again. That, in spite of two thousand years of knowledge, and canon, and religious conversations, and catacombs, and persecuti”

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My dearest and most cherished brother, Rob — I had no idea you were so well versed in Rohr-isms! He came to our org MTM in Aussie early in 2005 and we ended up conducting MROPs and selling his CD’s and DVD’s down-under for his blessed home called Radical Grace.

    I hear what you are voicing, my brother – in the very depths of my soul. Such deep truths are sometimes too much for some to bear. But to those of others of us, who seek wisdom through openness and transparency, we gravitate to writings such as these.

    Do I relate to these sentiments?

    “We, the converted, stand most in need of conversion. Jesus spent a lot of time ….healing blindness. This I believe was no accident…”

    More than mere words can relay. I’m not as poignant as you are, Robert Alan Rife. Pax et bonum, AAM

    Liked by 1 person

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